Moffett Physical Therapy

Services Provided
Women's Health
Pelvic Pain
Pregnancy and back pain
Prenatal and postpartum exercise
Sciatica
Sciatica is a form of buttock pain that can radiate into an individual's leg. This pain occurs when the sciatic nerve becomes irritated as a result of variety of reasons including disc herniation and disc bulge. Similar conditions may also produce 'sciatic like' symptoms which also can be rehabilitated with physical therapy services. These symptoms can be created from muscular imbalances, and spasms. A through physical therapy examination will guide a treatment program specific for an individual's needs. Treatment options include spinal range of motion exercises, stretching, core stabilization, strengthening exercises, manual therapy, modalities, back mechanics, ergonomic and posture education. Patients are also provided with a home exercise program, which is customized to the individual's needs.

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Tailbone Pain
Neck and Back Rehabilitation
Headaches/Migraines
Headaches and migraines can be a result of a variety of conditions. Physical therapy can treat some of the precipitating factors including, but not limited to: muscular strain and spasms, posture malalignments, poor body mechanics, inefficient workstation ergonomics, limited neck and trunk mobility, muscular weakness, and imbalances.

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Herniated disc
Herniated disc therapy Discs are found between the vertebrae in the spine. These discs are designed to be the body's shock absorbers, while also allowing for spinal mobility. Over time, or with trauma, the discs may deteriorate and progress to either a bulge or herniation. Bulges and herniations can result in low back, buttocks and/or leg pain, weakness and other dysfunctions. Physical therapy can assist with the reduction of pain and symptoms associated with disc herniations. Skilled therapeutic treatments may consist of range of motion exercises, stretching, core stabilization, strengthening exercises, manual therapy, modalities, back mechanics, ergonomics and posture education. Patients are also provided with a home exercise program, which is customized to the individual's needs.

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Laminectomy
Laminectomy is a surgical intervention that is utilized to treat radicular symptoms, disc herniations, spinal stenosis, and other spinal conditions. During this surgery, bone is removed from the vertebrae to create more space for the nerves leaving the spinal cord. A surgeon may also combine this procedure with a spinal fusion or discectomy. After this surgery, physical therapy is indicated to assist with a progression for a return to normal daily activities. Physical therapy treatment may consist of range of motion exercises, stretching, core stabilization, strengthening exercises, manual therapy, modalities, back mechanics, ergonomic and posture education. Patients are also provided with a customized home exercise program.

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Low back pain
It has been found that 80% of Americans have experienced low back pain at some point in their lifetime. If you have had back pain, you have an increased risk of it occurring again. There are many causes of low back pain, and many can be treated by skilled physical therapy interventions. Physical therapy can also reduce the risk of a reoccurrence of low back pain.

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McKenzie
McKenzie treatment is one form of physical therapy intervention that can reduce neck, mid back, and low back pain. This treatment consists of repetitive movements to assist with the reduction of radicular symptoms and improve spinal mobility. More specific information can be obtained from the McKenzie Institute at: http://www.mckenziemdt.org/profile.cfm

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Sacroiliac dysfunction
Sacroiliac dysfunction is a malalignment of the sacroiliac joint (SI joint). The SI joint is located where the bottom of the spine connects with the pelvis. This condition can cause low back and pelvic region discomfort, and it is often a missed diagnosis. This condition is often confused with other low back and hip issues which present with similar symptoms. Physical therapy can assist with pelvic realignement, and it can provide stabilization exercises to maintain better positioning. By improving SI alignment pressure and tension is relieved off the surrounding musculature, ligaments, fascia, and nerves, thus decreasing pain.

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Sciatica
Sciatica is a form of buttock pain that can radiate into an individual's leg. This pain occurs when the sciatic nerve becomes irritated as a result of variety of reasons including disc herniation and disc bulge. Similar conditions may also produce 'sciatic like' symptoms which also can be rehabilitated with physical therapy services. These symptoms can be created from muscular imbalances, and spasms. A through physical therapy examination will guide a treatment program specific for an individual's needs. Treatment options include spinal range of motion exercises, stretching, core stabilization, strengthening exercises, manual therapy, modalities, back mechanics, ergonomic and posture education. Patients are also provided with a home exercise program, which is customized to the individual's needs.

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Spinal fusion
Spinal fusion is a surgical procedure that is utilized to stabilize vertebrae. Screws and rods are placed on to the spine in order to provide stability and allow a bony union (fusion) to occur. After this surgery, physical therapy is indicated to assist with a progression for a return to normal daily activities. Physical therapy treatment may consist of range of motion exercises, stretching, core stabilization, strengthening exercises, manual therapy, modalities, back mechanics, ergonomic and posture education. Patients are also provided with an individualized home exercise program.

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Sprain/Strain
Sprains/strains of the neck and back can occur after trauma, with improper use of body mechanics, or the result of poor posture during daily or work activities. When strains occur, muscular spasms are typically found in the muscles stabilizing the spine which can result in stiffness and pain causing a loss of mobility and function. Physical therapy works to assist in the reduction of spasms and pain to help an individual return to his or her daily activities without dysfunction. Treatment options can vary depending on an individual's condition, along with the findings from a comprehensive physical therapy examination. Skilled treatments may consist of range of motion exercises, stretching, strengthening and stabilization exercises, manual therapy, modalities, back mechanics, ergonomic and posture education. Patients are also provided with an individualized home exercise program.

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Whiplash
Whiplash can occur from motor vehicle accidents and other traumatic events. It is a soft tissue injury to the neck musculature and support structures. This injury may also be called a neck sprain or strain. The mechanism of injury is most commonly a sudden backward movement of the neck followed by the neck rebounding forward in a rear-end accident. In this situation the neck has been moved beyond its normal range of motion. In severe cases, other trauma may have occurred including: disc or herniation, nerve impingement, fracture, intervertebral joint damage along with muscular trauma. Complaints of neck tightness and stiffness are the most prominent with this condition. Muscular spasming occurs to 'splint' the neck and upper back to avoid further injury. Physical therapy can assist with the reduction of pain and symptoms associated with whiplash. Skilled therapeutic treatments may consist of range of motion exercises, stretching, strengthening and stabilization exercises, manual therapy, modalities, back mechanics, ergonomics and posture education. Patients are also provided with an individualized home exercise program.

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Craniosacral Therapy
Knee Rehabilitation
ACL injury prevention program
We can show you how to decrease your risk! Did you know that there are over 250,000 ACL injuries per year in the USA? Soccer and basketball athletes experience the highest rate of serious knee injuries. Female athletes are at six to nine times greater risk than males for ACL injuries. Non-contact ACL injury was decreased 72% in athletes who participated in an ACL prevention program.(Hewett et al 1999) We offer a comprehensive research based program to prevent ACL injuries. This program is held 3 times per week for 60-75 minutes for 6 weeks. We start classes on a regular basis. Call for more information.

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ACL reconstruction
Chondromalacia
Chondromalacia patellae is a pathology that effects the kneecap (patella). It is a softening and degeneration of the cartilage under the patella. This condition may also be referred to as patellofemoral syndrome. A variety of reasons could cause the cartilage to wear down including poor patellar tracking, muscular imbalance, and over use. Typically, pain occurs behind the kneecap, especially with knee bending and stressful activities such as squatting and ascending and descending stairs. Physical therapy can assist with normalizing muscular balance, decreasing pain, and return to function.

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Knee Joint replacement
Knee joint replacement is the most common joint replacement surgery at this time. It is performed to replace the end of the tibia and femur which make up the knee joint. Depending on the individual, part of the patella may also be replaced. Currently an apparatus implanted, should be durable for a minimum of 15 years. This procedure is performed to decrease/eliminate pain and allow return to activities such as golfing, biking and swimming. Physical therapy is mandatory after a knee replacement in order to gain range of motion, strength, balance, proprioception. Gait training is important in assisting an individual's return to a previous level of function and resumption of daily living activities.

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Meniscus tear/repair
There are two types of cartilage found in the knee. The menisci are strong wedges of cartilage found between the knee joint. There is also articular cartilage, which lines the bones at the knee joint. When a meniscus tear occurs, most commonly it is due to a trauma such as an athletic injury or with degeneration as a result of the aging process. Pain, swelling at the knee joint, popping/clicking, loss of range of motion along with knee (locking) are common signs of a meniscus tear. A meniscus repair is a surgical procedure which repairs the cartilage. A meniscectomy is a procedure to remove the torn piece of cartilage. Physical therapy will enhance the speed of recovery after these procedures. The focus of treatment will be to regain range of motion, patellar mobility, strength, flexibility, proprioception, while returning to previous level of function.

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Patellar tendonitis
Patellar tendonitis occurs when the tendon which connects the kneecap (patella) to the shinbone (tibia) becomes irritated and inflamed. This injury is also known as 'jumper's knee' because it is commonly found in athletes, but it can occur from a trauma directly to the tendon. Pain typically occurs directly over the tendon, and swelling in this region may also be present. Physical therapy can provide an individual with a personalized treatment program to address his or her knee pain. Common treatments include stretching, strengthening exercises, soft tissue mobilization, ice, and progression to functional/sport specific activities.

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Patellofemoral syndrome
Patellofemoral syndrome is a common knee diagnosis, especially for active individuals. Theories vary on how this pathology forms. Typically pain occurs behind the kneecap, especially with knee bending and stressful activities such as squatting and ascending and descending stairs. Physical therapy can assist with normalizing muscular balance, decreasing pain, and return to function.

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Sprain and strain
Knee injuries are very common. Knee sprains occur when the ligaments of the knee are over stretched. Depending on the severity of the sprain, a tear of the ligament may also be present. A knee strain occurs when the muscles around the knee are over stretched. When a knee sprain or strain occurs, pain, swelling, and muscular weakness are very common. Physical therapy can assist with the reduction of these impairments and facilitate a faster return to normal function.

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Shoulder Rehabilitation
Dislocation
The shoulder is most mobile joint in the body. It is very susceptible dislocation. A partial dislocation is called a subluxation. A dislocation occurs when the entire humerus (upper arm bone) comes out of the socket. Afterwards muscular guarding, spasming and pain limit motion. Subluxations and dislocations also result in shoulder instability. A rotator cuff and/or labral (cartilage) tear may also be present after a dislocation. Physical therapy treatment after dislocation is prescribed to reduce pain, improve stability, reduce guarding and spasming, along with increasing functional shoulder motion. In some cases, chronic instability can occur after dislocation. In these cases, surgery is indicated and physical therapy will be re-instated post-operatively to assist with return to normal function.

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Fracture
Fractures of the shoulder, clavicle, and shoulder blade (scapula) often occur from trauma such as falling on an outstretched arm. For a displaced, or bad, fracture surgical intervention with plates and screws is indicated. Once the fracture is stable, physical therapy is indicated to reduce pain, increase range of motion, strength, scapular stability, and flexibility to progress to a speedy return to previous level of function.

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Frozen shoulder
Frozen shoulder is also known as adhesive capsulitis. The exact mechanism of why this condition occurs is not known. Pain is typically described as a general ache about the shoulder and there is a progressive loss of motion. If left untreated frozen shoulders can take two to three years to heal. According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, over 90 percent of patients recover with conservative treatments. Physical therapy can assist with pain control along with improving range of motion. As motion of the shoulder improves, exercises for strengthening and stabilization are provided. Rehabilitation for a frozen shoulder also includes posture education, joint mobilization, soft tissue mobilization, modalities, and a customized home exercise program.

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Pre- and post-operative treatment
There are a number of surgical interventions for the shoulder. Some of them are: rotator cuff repair, bankart repair, fracture ORIF, clavicle repair, subacromial decompression, etc. Physical therapy can be utilized before and after surgery. Therapy prior to surgery is sometimes indicated to assure better outcomes and quicker recovery time. After surgery, the focus of therapy is to improve range of motion, flexibility, scapular stability, posture, and return to prior level of function.

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Rotator cuff impingement
Impingement is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain. The rotator cuff is composed of four muscles: supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres major, and teres minor. Impingement commonly occurs when the acromion (the front part of the shoulder blade) rubs against the tendons of the muscles as the arm is raised. This condition can occur as a result of sports injury, repetitive lifting, or spontaneously. Pain from other conditions such as bursitis or tendonitis may feel similar. An orthopedic surgeon may recommend surgical intervention to remove a spur (extra bone formation) to reduce impingement at this joint if it is present. Physical therapy treatment includes stretching, strengthening, stabilization exercises, soft tissue mobilization, joint mobilization, posture education and individualized home exercise program.

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Rotator cuff tear
The rotator cuff of the shoulder is composed of four muscles: supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres major, and teres minor. These muscles help stabilize, rotate and lift the arm. Most commonly the supraspinatus is the muscle torn in the rotator cuff. Injuries to these tendons are often a result of sports injury, repetitive lifting or activities, or trauma such as a dislocation or fracture. Some of the signs of a rotator cuff tear are: weakness, pain with movement/reaching, and popping/clicking sounds. Physical therapy can be utilized before and after surgery. The focus of therapy is to improve range of motion, flexibility, scapular stability, posture, and return to prior level of function.

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Hip Rehabilitation
Bursitis
Hip bursitis is often a chronic injury to the hip. A bursa is a jelly like sac found at the joints which is meant to help decrease the pressure between the muscular tendons and the bone. The bursa is located on the outside of the hip, and it is normally slightly tender to the touch. When the bursa becomes irritated and inflamed it is called 'bursitis.' This injury can occur from a variety of factors including overuse, injury such as falling on the joint, arthritis, and leg length, or spinal inequalities. Physical therapy addresses factors to reduce stress on the hip on an individual basis. Treatment can include flexibility exercises, strengthening, custom orthotic fabrication (shoe inserts), soft tissue mobilization/massage, modalities, and individualized home exercise instruction.

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Joint replacement
Hip replacement surgery is a common and successful surgery to assist with the reduction of hip pain, and to increase mobility and function. There are a variety of techniques and prosthetics that can be utilized, depending on the patient and orthopedic surgeons preferred practice. Physical therapy is utilized pre- and post-surgery to obtain the best outcomes for the patient. Treatment includes education regarding hip precautions/guidelines, gait training, strengthening, transfer training, and facilitation to return to normal activities along with a home exercise program.

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Piriformis syndrome
Piriformis syndrome is often mistaken for sciatica. Sciatica is a form of buttock pain that can radiate into an individual's leg. This pain occurs when the sciatic nerve becomes irritated as a result of variety of reasons including disc herniation and disc bulge. Similar conditions, like piriformis syndrome, may also produce 'sciatic like' symptoms which can be rehabilitated with physical therapy. These symptoms can be produced from muscular imbalances and spasms. A thorough physical therapy examination will guide a treatment program specific for an individual's needs. Treatment options include spinal range of motion exercises, stretching, core stabilization, strengthening exercises, manual therapy, modalities, back mechanics, ergonomic and posture education. Patients are also provided with a home exercise program, which is customized to the individual's needs

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Post-operative fracture
Hip replacement surgery, or plates and screws, are often implanted after a hip fracture. Physical therapy is utilized post-surgically to obtain the best outcomes for the patient. Treatment includes education regarding hip precautions/guidelines, gait training, strengthening, transfer training, facilitation to return to normal activities along with a home exercise program. Since many hip fractures occur after a fall, physical therapy also addresses fall prevention, and provides balance training. Physical therapists can also prescribe an assistive device such as a cane or walker when indicated. The goal of therapy is to return the individual to the highest level of function and independence as quickly and safely as possible.

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Sacroiliac dysfunction
Sacroiliac dysfunction is a misalignment of the sacroiliac joint (SI joint). The SI joint is located where the bottom of the spine connects with the pelvis. This condition can cause low back and pelvic region discomfort, and it is often a missed diagnosis. This condition is often confused with other low back and hip issues which present with similar symptoms. Physical therapy can assist with pelvic realignement, and it can provide stabilization exercises to maintain better positioning. By improving SI alignment pressure and tension is relieved off the surrounding musculature, ligaments, fascia, and nerves, thus decreasing pain.

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Elbow and Wrist Rehabilitation
Carpal Tunnel
Carpal Tunnel is a condition of the hand and wrist. One of the nerves (median) to the hand is compressed in the wrist (carpal tunnel) resulting in pain, numbness, and tingling. Symptoms usually come and go, and can decrease with moving and shaking the hands. If not treated, symptoms progress with time to a point when surgery is indicated. Symptoms can occur with driving, typing, carrying objects, and reading. When this condition progresses, weakness in the hand is often found. Physical therapy provides the patient with workstation ergonomics, splinting (if necessary), strengthening, stretching, and home exercises.

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Colle's fracture
A Colle's fracture is the most common fracture of the wrist. This kind of fracture is sustained after a fall on an outstretched arm. The wrist is composed of two bones: the radius and ulna. A Colle's fracture is a fracture of the radius. In more severe cases the ulna may also be broken. In some cases this fracture needs to be stabilized with surgery. A loss of strength and motion occurs due to the lack of use and mobility of the wrist as the fracture heals. Physical therapy can assist with the return of motion and strength to speed the recovery process. Rehabilitation post fracture includes: providing appropriate bracing if needed, stretching, strengthening exercises, soft tissue mobilization, modalities, and customized home exercise programs.

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Golfer's elbow
Golfer's elbow is also known as medical epicondylitis. The action of the muscles that attach at this point of the elbow cause the wrist to flex. Pain described is similar to tennis elbow; a sharp or burning discomfort on the inside of the elbow which can progress into the forearm. Physical therapy treats this condition by providing appropriate bracing if needed, stretching, strengthening exercises, soft tissue mobilization, modalities, and customized home exercise programs.

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Tennis elbow
Tennis elbow is also known as lateral epicondylitis. It is a form of tendonitis of the elbow commonly found in athletes that play racket sports and also in workers with jobs requiring repetition. The action of the muscles that attach at this point of the elbow cause the wrist to lift upward (extend). Pain is often described as a sharp or burning discomfort on the outside of the elbow which can progress into the forearm. It can occur with both elbow and/or wrist movements. Physical therapy treats this condition by providing appropriate bracing if needed, stretching, strengthening exercises, soft tissue mobilization, modalities, and customized home exercise programs.

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Ankle and Foot Rehabilitation
Bunionectomy
Bunions are a malformation of the big toe that occurs over time. The most common cause is due to poorly fitting shoes, but arthritis and genetics play a roll in bunion formation. Bunionectomy is a surgical technique, which is utilized to realign the big toe and remove excess bone and soft tissue, which makes up the bunion. Physical therapy after this surgery assists with improving mobility, reducing pain and swelling, providing scar mobilization, balance and proprioceptive training. Home exercises are also provided to assist with speeding recovery time.

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Plantar fasciitis
Plantar fasciitis is a painful condition of the foot which causes heel pain. Typically the pain is most severe with the first few steps in the morning or after sitting for a long duration. There are a few factors that contribute to this condition including: overuse, poor footwear, poor flexibility of the calf, obesity, high or low arches, or if the individual walks or stands on hard surfaces, such as concrete, for long durations. Physical therapy addresses these factors by providing strengthening and flexibility exercises, balance and proprioceptive activities, soft tissue mobilization/massage, modalities, foot wear education, splinting if necessary, gait training, and individualized home exercise programs.

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Post-operative
Ankle and foot surgeries result in a loss of ankle and foot motion, balance, proprioception, and strength. These factors result in changes in the ability to walk and function in the community. There is also an association of increased risk of falls. Physical therapy can address these issues with treatment and custom home exercises.

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Sprains
Sprains of the ankle can occur after trauma, such as rolling out on the foot. When sprains occur, swelling, stiffness, and pain result in a loss of mobility and function making it difficult to walk. Depending on the severity of the sprain, treatment options may vary. Severe sprains of the ligaments may partially or fully tear, which may require surgery and immobilization. Physical therapy works to assist in the reduction of pain and improve motion safely in order for an individual to return to his or her daily activities without dysfunction. Treatment options can vary depending on and individual's condition, along with comprehensive physical therapy examination findings. Skilled treatments may consist of range of motion exercises, stretching, strengthening and stabilization exercises, manual therapy, modalities, orthotic fabrication (shoe inserts), footwear assessment, gait training, balance, and proprioceptive exercises. Patients are also provided with an individualized home exercise program.

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Balance and Vestibular Disorders
Balance and Fall prevention
Physical therapy can provide valuable education and treatment options for fall prevention and improvements in balance and coordination. We utilize the latest standardized tests and measurements found in medical literature to test for fall risk and to assist with designing individualized treatment plans. Physical therapists can also prescribe and fit an assistive device such as a cane or walker when indicated. The goal of therapy is to return the individual to the highest level of function and independence as quickly and safely as possible.

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Dizziness
Dizziness can occur from a variety of conditions and becomes more common as we age. Some of these conditions such as BPPV, Meniers's disease flare-ups, vertigo, migraines, and vestibular hypofunction can be treated with physical therapy. Often cases of BPPV, which is the most common cause of dizziness, can be reduced or eliminated in 1 to 3 physical therapy visits. Depending on the cause of the dizziness, treatment may vary per individual. Physical therapy may include fall prevention, balance and proprioceptive exercises, coordination activities, positioning techniques, gait training, and assistive device prescription.

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Neuropathy
Neuropathy is a disorder of the nervous system which effects the nerves after they leave the spinal cord. Peripheral neuropathy typically effects the hands and feet due to nerve degeneration. There are more than one hundred types of neuropathy and symptoms can vary from individual to individual. Some common symptoms are: numbness, tingling, burning, weakness, pain, muscle wasting, excessive sweating, and hypersensitivity to touch. Neuropathies can also progress to paralysis. Physical therapy can help reduce the impact of neuropathy. Treatments can include: modalities, desensitization techniques, strengthening and flexibility exercises, orthotic fabrication (shoe inserts)/prosthetic recommendations, gait training, balance and proprioceptive exercises, assistive device prescription, and fall prevention.

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Vestibular Rehabilitation
Vestibular rehabilitation encompasses a variety of conditions that can effect a person's balance and coordination. Some of the conditions treated are BPPV, migraines, Meniere's disease flare-ups, vestibular hypofunction, and vertigo. Physical therapy examination provides a battery of tests and measurements to determine the best treatment options for the individual. Often in cases of BPPV, dizziness can be significantly reduced or eliminated in 1 to 3 visits. Vestibular rehabilitation also encompasses fall prevention, balance and proprioceptive exercises, coordination activities, positioning techniques, gait training, and assistive device prescription. An individual may also receive other services such as strengthening and flexibility exercises, depending on his or her individualized needs.

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Other Services
Chronic Pain Management
Free Injury Screen
Moffett Physical Therapy provides a free thirty-minute injury screen that can address if an individual is in need of physical therapy and/or further medical follow-up. Screens are set up on an appointment basis. Please call (847) 659-1000 for further information.

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Golf fitness
Pre-operative physical therapy examination
TMJ
Visceral manipulation